The Lesson From Trump

 

The Words of Future Leaders Must not Reflect Establishment Interests if True Reform is to be Realized

by Zachary J. Borodkin

“So help me God” were the final words spoken on January 20th, making Trump’s presidency a reality. While half the country freaked out over the mere fact of his inauguration, little attention was paid to Trump’s message.

His message did not reflect corporate interests, a common indicator of establishment’s grip on power. Trump galvanized people who are angry with the political establishment. Though he isn’t the only president to make promises to help the country, past messages have been nothing but sound bites dictated by corporate interests. Former presidents enacted policies that did little to help the public, while the corporate donors behind these policies reaped the benefits.

Different sources interpreted Trump’s message in various ways, depending, but I am exclusively talking about the principal behind his message. Messages should be strong, resonating with the public, while also maintaining an openness to different ideas. Within his words was the principal of courage.

The public is angry with the establishment. During campaign season, his opponents lacked the courage to tell corporations that their money and influence hijack our democracy. Corporate interference in politics has been a constant force the last few decades, and Trump’s supporters believe that this cycle has finally been broken. Sanders was the only Democratic candidate who called out Wall Street and its influence on politics, saying during the Primaries last year, “the bankers will not like me very much if I am president.” Trump echoed this message:“I cannot be bought.” Sanders was not chosen to represent his party, but Trump’s similar rhetoric against the establishment allowed the Republican Party to win.

I’ve always believed that social change is taking place and that it is up to millennials to work together to change our reality. As the next generation of leaders, we need to have courage, like Trump; we need to use this courage to tell the 1 percent that they will not speak for us. We will not bend our message to their will.

Anti-establishment messages brought forth this last year and a half redefined the election and may even redefine what it means to be President. Some in the media are calling this a new era: “the end of establishment politics.” There are even political scientists predicting a massive shift in the political narratives for future elections.

Trump’s message during his Inaugural Address is a strikingly different vision for the country. With a new generation on the rise, it is not clear whether Trump’s message will carry into the future, but for now, the generation of youth that has been stuck with student loans, economic downturn, and the results of poor decisions on foreign policy, must have the courage to call out and turn away from the empty rhetoric of establishment politics.

Trump created a new narrative that will determine the course of our future, since he will not be the only anti-establishment candidate in our lifetime. Whatever one’s message may be, we must have the courage to speak our minds if we are to be the change we seek.

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