The Economics of “A Christmas Carol”

By Darina Keshtova Christmas is a very special time of the year, associated not only with widely beloved traditions, favorite movies, hot chocolate, fir trees, and heart-warming stories, but also with economic and social significance. As a person studying these topics, I find it interesting to learn about economic trends during holidays like Christmas, where countless consumers engage in transactions with thousands of sellers, annually spending around eight hundred billion dollars. Even though the socio-economic…

Halloween Economics

By Darina Keshtova Every year, millions of people in the United States have fun on Halloween. This month is special not only for children and their parents, but also for economists who study trends in the consumer goods market. Preparing for this holiday is a high priority for many, and in the run-up to All Saints’ Day, people purchase themed costumes, decorations, gifts, and—of course—candy, all to organize themed events for themselves and their friends.…

B.U. Needs More Instruction in Blockchain

By Darina Keshtova We live in a rapidly changing world where new technology dramatically alters the course of people’s lives. Today, the ability to receive timely information about the emergence of new revolutionary technologies, the ability to anticipate the changes that they will cause, and to be among the people who apply, promote, and develop innovations is becoming a prerequisite for success. This knowledge can also protect us from spending limited, dead-end resources (in an…

The Case For Linguistic Universalism

By Shayne O’Loughlin Within translation theory there exists sources of constant debate among scholars in just how we ought to translate works between languages. Among these debates are those between “linguistic universalism” and “linguistic relativism,” and their respective 20th century proponents Noam Chomsky and the dynamic duo of Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf. To summarize into horribly dubious simplicity, linguistic universalism posits that all concepts are translatable, whereas linguistic relativism posits that language impacts the…

AI, the Scourge of Humanity?

By Joe Badalamenti In the past century, technological advancement has been growing at an exponential rate. Artificial Intelligence (or AI), a specific application of computing technology, has been developed to complete increasingly complex tasks: DallE has the ability to generate unique and detailed paintings; ChatGPT has the ability to create essays, code slices, and other complex compositions, all the while newer, more advanced AI programs are being developed each day. Will Artificial Intelligence programs reach…

PEPFAR: Giving Thanks for an Unpopular President

By Arthur O’Sullivan George W. Bush’s international legacy is—let’s just say—controversial. His global war on terror and tyranny appeared to increase both, especially to his enemies on the right and left. He famously entered the presidency with a budget surplus and a functioning economy, and left it with ballooning debt and a severe recession, the effects of which still resound in countries such as Greece. Regardless of his own culpability, such crises tarnished his reputation,…

Parallel AES Algorithm for Performance Improvement

Hrishitva Patel  The era of the so-called “Internet of Things” (IoT) has resulted in an ever-increasing number of connected people and devices. In 2015, more than 15 billion devices were connected, and in 2019 that number reached nearly 26 billion. By 2025, this number may reach 75 billion devices worldwide. While enjoying the services brought about by the IoT, there is increasing scrutiny on the security of its technologies, especially after infamous hacks and leaks…

The Medical Case Against Vaccine Mandates

By Siddharth Gundapaneni For a significant period of time, all employers in New York City, public or private, required mandated vaccination against COVID-19 for all their employees. Mayor Bill DeBlasio championed the “Vaccine Key to New York City” program, requiring proof of vaccination for those at least five years of age in order to utilize indoor dining, gyms and other fitness areas, and entertainment spaces. This included but was not limited to: movie theaters, concert…

There’s No Place for Zoning Laws in Binghamton

By Siddharth Gundapaneni On July 19th, Binghamton Mayor Jared Kraham put forth a new housing law with the purpose of “protecting the integrity of single-family residential neighborhoods.”  In an attempt to diversify housing options available for locals, this law will place significant restrictions on where students looking to live off-campus are able to reside. Unfortunately, the consequences of this policy will not be as favorable as the Mayor may have hoped.  This law will immediately…

Austrian Economics: A Genuine Fix to Monetary Policy in the U.S.

By Logan Blakeslee  Among all mainstream schools of economic thought in the western world, one black sheep stands out. The Austrian School, as it is commonly known, was founded by Carl Menger and Ludwig von Mises in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Their ideas and those of their contemporaries, far from being outdated or incompatible with the modern global economic structure, are quite possibly the tools necessary to save it from collapse.  The…

Your Professors Aren’t Supposed to Educate You

By Siddharth Gundapaneni Students are increasingly scrutinizing their academic institutions, often saying that their college professors fail to teach the subject adequately. When asking a college graduate about their knowledge of a subject they took a class in, it’s typically below what one would expect of someone with such a degree. As a justification, students (myself included) often say that professors only “teach to the test,” meaning that professors don’t try to teach a subject…

Marijuana Inflation at Binghamton University

By Siddharth Gundapenini In the United States, inflation accounting serves an ever more important role. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic Analysis, and numerous private firms all calculate different measures of inflation, all with the same general purpose of allowing macroeconomic researchers to understand how much prices are rising, what specific goods/services are gaining popularity, and where these changes are taking place. Unfortunately, this analysis remains confined to goods and services sold legally.…

The Seed Oil Hypothesis

Joe Badalamenti One of the benefits of the decentralization of the internet is that people can and will discuss topics outside of the 3 to 5 current trendy events. While browsing the World Wide Web to pass the time,  I came across something that can change the way everyone thinks about nutrition: the seed oil hypothesis. This hypothesis describes the harmful effects of commonly-used vegetable oils. While nutritional chemistry and human physiology are very complex…

The Loneliness Epidemic

Julius Apostata For some people, finding a date is easy: simply walk up to someone you find cute, have a conversation, one thing leads to another, and congratulations! You now have a significant other. Of course, this is a rather oversimplified summary of finding a date, and many—myself included—have run through this general outline a couple of times. Yet what if I told you that there are some that have NOT run through this process;…

The Economics of… Sex?

By Siddharth Gundapaneni Public perception of varying sexual behaviors has rapidly changed during the last century. Premarital sex no longer faces the societal stigmas it once did, pornography is more acceptable than ever, and support for prostitution is also reaching highs. Why are these changes occurring? Has society gone sex-crazed? Have people begun to just care less about what others do in the bedroom? While some of these propositions may be true, they are hardly…